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Kim Kardashian Shows Off Her Huge Engagement Ring

The reality star mimics an iconic photo of Elizabeth Taylor! Check out other cute and candid moments from the stars.

Source: http://www.ivillage.com/celebrity-twitter-pictures/1-b-229669?dst=iv%3AiVillage%3Acelebrity-twitter-pictures-229669
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How to add Finder Tags to iCloud documents with OS X Mavericks

How to add Finder Tags to a file saved in iCloud with OS X Mavericks

We’ve already talked about how to set up and start using Finder Tags in OS X Mavericks, but what about documents that aren’t stored on your computer, but in iCloud instead? It’s just as easy to apply Finder Tags to new and existing iCloud documents too. Here’s how:

Before beginning, it’s worth noting that for either of these methods to work, the app you are using must support storing files in iCloud. Apps like Pages, Keynote, Numbers, and many third party apps have support for iCloud document storage. Just make sure that before you try and save a document to iCloud, the app or program you’re using supports it.

How to add Finder Tags to a new iCloud document or file

  1. Launch the app that you want to create the new iCloud document in. In this case, we’ll use Numbers for Mac.
  2. Click on New Document. Depending on what app or program you’re using, there may be different wording or other steps.
  3. Once you have an open document type of your choice, click in the title field at the top in order to rename the document and add Finder Tags.
  4. Once you’ve chosen a name (if you haven’t already), just choose from existing tags or start typing a new one.
  5. Lastly, make sure under the option for where the document is saved, iCloud is selected.

That’s all there is to it. Just note that some programs and apps may vary slightly depending on the type of app and how the developer decided to lay out menus.

How to add Finder Tags to an existing iCloud document or file

  1. Launch the app that you’ve already created an iCloud document within and locate it.
  2. Click on the document one time in order to highlight it.
  3. In the bottom menu, click on the Finder Tags icon and type in a new tag or choose from an existing one.

That’s it. Your documents will now start appearing under the tag, or tags, that you’ve specified. Note that you can highlight multiple documents at once by holding down the command key and selecting them. This is convenient for times when you need to tag the same kinds of documents all at once in a batch.

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True Patriot: Volume 2 hits Kickstarter, go get your Canadian comics cool on!

True Patriot: Volume 2 hits Kickstarter

One of the bright (northern) lights of Kickstarter for me recently was True Patriot, a Canadian comic book spearheaded by J. Torres. I saw it. I backed it. He shipped it. I got it. And I enjoyed the heck out of it. It worked out well for all involved, in fact, and so much so that Volume 2 is now on the way. You can back it a little and get a PDF copy perfect for reading on your iPad, or you can back it a lot and get a real-world book (you can even back it all the way and get original art). This, to me, is Kickstarter done right. It supports the arts, enables projects that would otherwise be improbable or impossible, and it nets me more great stuff. Win/win. I loved Volume 1, I’m in on Volume to, so check out True Patriot on Kickstarter now, and if you like it, back it.


    







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You can buy subway tickets with squats in Moscow

You can buy subway tickets with squats in Moscow

Not everything in Russia is crazy people in cars, anti-gay mobs and a Nazi government with no respect to human rights. Here’s something that I wish we had: a machine that gives you a subway ticket for 30 squats in less than two minutes.

Read more…


    

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/Jnfs9l84SFI/@kcampbelldollaghan
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Nick & Joe Jonas Perform Jonas Brother Tunes without Kevin

After publicly confirming their split last month, the Jonas Brothers still hit the stage (kind of).

Nickand Joe Jonas rocked out during the Telehit Awards Concert in Mexico City on Wednesday (November 13), noticeably leaving out older brother Kevin.

Before the duo took to the stage, the 21-year-old and the 24-year-old chatted with Telehit about surprising their fans.

“It’s a lot of pressure,” Nick explained. “We actually didn’t know that until just a couple of minutes ago. We were actually surprised by that. But it’ll be great. The fans here are always amazing. We’ve played the venue before and it’s always a good time.”

Joe chimed in, “I think there’s always a little nervous energy when you go out on stage. I’m just excited to get out there.”

Unfortunately the third bandmate and oldest brother Kevin didn’t join in on the special appearance.

“Kevin is focusing on his business ventures,” a source close to the brothers told E! News. “As announced earlier, the band is no longer together. However, the guys made a commitment to Telehit and wanted to keep that commitment.

While he didn’t make that performance, Kevin is still set to hit the stage as co-host of the 2013 Teen Nick HALO Awards on Sunday (November 17).

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/jonas-brothers/jonas-mexico-1115956
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JAMA Dermatology: Social media brings academic journals to general readers

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

14-Nov-2013

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Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver


A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Dermatology shows that a handful of academic journals have successfully leveraged social media to reach many times the readers of the journals themselves. But the majority of journals have yet to embrace social media and so lag behind professional organizations and patient advocacy groups in their ability to disseminate information in a culturally relevant way.

“If a journal wants to educate people, this is a way to do it,” says Robert Dellavalle, MD, PhD, MSPH, investigator at the CU Cancer Center and associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dellavalle also manages the Facebook page for the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Fittingly, Dellavalle worked on the project remotely, collaborating with a handful of medical students now included as co-authors.

The study evaluated the social media presences of 102 dermatology journals and also dermatology organizations and patient-advocacy groups. The social media followings of the most popular patient advocacy networks were about double the followings of the most popular professional organizations, which were about double the followings of the most popular journals. For example, at the time of study the Skin Cancer Foundation had 20,119 Facebook followers, the Dermatology Network had 11,251 Facebook followers, and Dellavalle’s Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Facebook page had 5,286 followers.

That said, “you look at the New England Journal of Medicine and they’re getting hundreds of thousands of reads through their social media presence. They’re not getting nearly that many reads on the journal itself,” Dellavalle says.

The study also showed that more prominent journals tend to have stronger social media followings. “Especially in terms of Facebook followings, the journals with the highest impact factors have the most followers,” Dellavalle says.

At the time of study, the New England Journal of Medicine had 439,022 Facebook followers. However, as good as the leading journals undoubtedly are in creating and managing social media presences, there’s a steep decline in the usage and success of lesser-known journals. Of the 102 dermatology journals studied, only 12.7 percent had a Facebook presence and 13.7 percent had a Twitter presence.

“Some journals haven’t recognized the potential of fully embracing popular social networks,” Dellavalle says. “Even in the community of academic researchers, there’s an ever-changing goal post of relevance. If you don’t remain active, you fall behind the times. With continued technological evolution, organizations that fail to recognize the opportunity provided by social networking sites risk becoming marginalized by their inability to assimilate to social media as an expected form of communication.”


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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

14-Nov-2013

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Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver


A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Dermatology shows that a handful of academic journals have successfully leveraged social media to reach many times the readers of the journals themselves. But the majority of journals have yet to embrace social media and so lag behind professional organizations and patient advocacy groups in their ability to disseminate information in a culturally relevant way.

“If a journal wants to educate people, this is a way to do it,” says Robert Dellavalle, MD, PhD, MSPH, investigator at the CU Cancer Center and associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dellavalle also manages the Facebook page for the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Fittingly, Dellavalle worked on the project remotely, collaborating with a handful of medical students now included as co-authors.

The study evaluated the social media presences of 102 dermatology journals and also dermatology organizations and patient-advocacy groups. The social media followings of the most popular patient advocacy networks were about double the followings of the most popular professional organizations, which were about double the followings of the most popular journals. For example, at the time of study the Skin Cancer Foundation had 20,119 Facebook followers, the Dermatology Network had 11,251 Facebook followers, and Dellavalle’s Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Facebook page had 5,286 followers.

That said, “you look at the New England Journal of Medicine and they’re getting hundreds of thousands of reads through their social media presence. They’re not getting nearly that many reads on the journal itself,” Dellavalle says.

The study also showed that more prominent journals tend to have stronger social media followings. “Especially in terms of Facebook followings, the journals with the highest impact factors have the most followers,” Dellavalle says.

At the time of study, the New England Journal of Medicine had 439,022 Facebook followers. However, as good as the leading journals undoubtedly are in creating and managing social media presences, there’s a steep decline in the usage and success of lesser-known journals. Of the 102 dermatology journals studied, only 12.7 percent had a Facebook presence and 13.7 percent had a Twitter presence.

“Some journals haven’t recognized the potential of fully embracing popular social networks,” Dellavalle says. “Even in the community of academic researchers, there’s an ever-changing goal post of relevance. If you don’t remain active, you fall behind the times. With continued technological evolution, organizations that fail to recognize the opportunity provided by social networking sites risk becoming marginalized by their inability to assimilate to social media as an expected form of communication.”


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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uocd-jds111413.php
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India launches first mission to Mars

The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C25) rocket lifts off carrying India’s Mars spacecraft from the east coast island of Sriharikota, India, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. India on Tuesday launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars, a complex mission that it hopes will demonstrate and advance technologies for space travel. The 1,350-kilogram (3,000-pound) Mangalyaan orbiter was headed first into an elliptical orbit around Earth, after which a series of technical maneuvers and short burns will raise its orbit before it slingshots toward Mars. (AP Photo/Arun Sankar K)

The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C25) rocket lifts off carrying India’s Mars spacecraft from the east coast island of Sriharikota, India, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. India on Tuesday launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars, a complex mission that it hopes will demonstrate and advance technologies for space travel. The 1,350-kilogram (3,000-pound) Mangalyaan orbiter was headed first into an elliptical orbit around Earth, after which a series of technical maneuvers and short burns will raise its orbit before it slingshots toward Mars. (AP Photo/Arun Sankar K)

A rocket carrying the Mars orbiter takes off from the east-coast island of Sriharikota, India, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. India on Tuesday launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars, a complex mission that it hopes will demonstrate and advance technologies for space travel. (AP Photo/Arun Sankar K)

A rocket carrying the Mars orbiter streaks across the sky after taking off from the east-coast island of Sriharikota, India, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. India on Tuesday launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars, a complex mission that it hopes will demonstrate and advance technologies for space travel. (AP Photo/Arun Sankar K)

Indian Space and Research Organization Chairman, K. Radhakrishnan, center, address the media after the launch of the rocket carrying the Mars orbiter from Sriharikota, at Sriharikota, India, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. India on Tuesday launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars, a complex mission that it hopes will demonstrate and advance technologies for space travel.(AP Photo/Arun Sankar K)

Indian Space and Research Organization Chairman, K. Radhakrishnan, center, addresses the media after the launch of the rocket carrying the Mars orbiter from Sriharikota, at Sriharikota, India, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. India on Tuesday launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars, a complex mission that it hopes will demonstrate and advance technologies for space travel. Hindi reads, “Satish Dhawan Space Center, Sriharikota.”.(AP Photo/Arun Sankar K)

(AP) — India on Tuesday launched its first spacecraft bound for Mars, a complex mission that it hopes will demonstrate and advance technologies for space travel.

Hundreds of people watched the rocket carrying the Mars orbiter take off from the east-coast island of Sriharikota and streak across the sky. Many more across the country watched live TV broadcasts.

Officials at the space center described it as a “textbook launch.” If the mission is successful, India will become only the fourth nation to visit the red planet after the Soviet Union, the United States and Europe.

“Capturing and igniting the young minds of India and across the globe will be the major return from this mission,” mission director P. Kunhikrishnan said from the launch site.

After 44 minutes, the orbiter separated from the rocket and entered into an elliptical path around Earth. Over the next 20-25 days, it will perform a series of technical maneuvers and short burns to raise its orbit before it slingshots toward Mars.

“With teamwork and the kind of dedication we have today, any mission is not beyond our capability,” said S. Ramakrishnan, head of the space center and launch authorization board.

The 1,350-kilogram (3,000-pound) orbiter Mangalyaan, which means “Mars craft” in Hindi, must travel 780 million kilometers (485 million miles) over 300 days to reach an orbit around the red planet next September.

“The biggest challenge will be precisely navigating the spacecraft to Mars,” said K. Radhakrishnan, chairman of the Indian Space and Research Organization. “We will know if we pass our examination on Sept. 24, 2014.”

He congratulated the scientists for putting the mission together “in a very limited time.” The project began after the space agency carried out a feasibility study in 2010 after successfully launching a lunar satellite in 2008. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announced the planned voyage to Mars only last year during his annual address to the nation.

“It’s a really big thing for India!” said 13-year-old Pratibha Maurya, who gathered with her father and about 50 others to watch the launch at the Nehru Planetarium in New Delhi.

Some have questioned the $72 million price tag for a country of 1.2 billion people still dealing with widespread hunger and poverty. But the government defended the Mars mission, and its $1 billion space program in general, by noting its importance in providing high-tech jobs for scientists and engineers and practical applications in solving problems on Earth.

Decades of space research have allowed India to develop satellite, communications and remote sensing technologies that are helping to solve everyday problems at home, from forecasting where fish can be caught by fishermen to predicting storms and floods.

“These missions are important. These are things that give Indians happiness and bragging rights,” said Raghu Kalra of the Amateur Astronomers Association Delhi. “Even a poor person, when he learns that my country is sending a mission to another planet, he will feel a sense of pride for his country, and he will want to make it a better place.”

The orbiter will gather images and data that will help in determining how Martian weather systems work and what happened to the large quantities of water that are believed to have once existed on Mars. It also will search Mars for methane, a key chemical in life processes that could also come from geological processes. Experts say the data will improve understanding about how planets form, what conditions might make life possible and where else in the universe it might exist.

The orbiter is expected to have at least six months to investigate the planet’s landscape and atmosphere. At its closest point it will be 365 kilometers (227 miles) from the planet’s surface, and its furthest point will be 80,000 kilometers (49,700 miles) away.

___

Online: Indian Space and Research Organization: http://www.isro.org/

___

Follow Katy Daigle on Twitter at twitter.com/katydaigle

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/b2f0ca3a594644ee9e50a8ec4ce2d6de/Article_2013-11-05-India-Mars%20Mission/id-4cd71dbf20fd4f3f8256312e25d92ede
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Hayden Panettiere Gives a Cat’s Eye View of Her Engagement Ring

Still engaging in some Halloween shenanigans, the gorgeous Hayden Panettiere posted a self-pic featuring a pair of creepy-kitty contact lenses, as well as her flawless engagement ring.

The lenses were pink, giving the 24-year-old a cat’s eye look. She tweeted about her lenses, writing, “Halloween contacts finally came….better late than never I guess.”

Hayden’s ring may have also hogged our attention, as the rock covers a good portion of her finger. In an interview, the “Nashville” beauty said that she actually created the ring herself with Montblanc, it being presented to her when boyfriend Wladimir Klitschko bent his knee to her.

“They made me this amazing book where they did a bunch of sketches,” she said. “I told them my idea over time and tweaking things here and there, and it came to fruition.”

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/hayden-panettiere/hayden-panettiere-gives-cats-eye-view-her-engagement-ring-958263
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Volcanic rock probe helps unlock mysteries of how Earth formed

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh


New insights gleaned from volcanic rock are helping scientists better understand how our planet evolved billions of years ago.

Studies of basalt, the material that forms from cooling lava, are being used to develop a timeline of how the planet and its atmosphere were formed.

Scientists examined liquid basalt or magma at record high pressures and temperatures. Their findings suggest molten magma once formed an ocean within the Earth’s mantle, comprising two layers of fluid separated by a crystalline layer.

Scientists agree that Earth formed around 4.5 billion years ago, at which time much of the planet was molten. As it cooled, Earth’s crust was formed. Researchers are keen to pin down how the planet’s core and crust took shape and how its volcanic activity developed.

The discovery by a European team of scientists involving the University of Edinburgh, using hi-tech laboratories, supports current theories of how and when our planet evolved. To recreate conditions at the Earth’s core, scientists placed basalt under pressures equivalent to almost one billion times that of Earth’s atmosphere and temperatures above 2000 Celsius.

They found that at high pressure, silicon atoms in the basalt change the way in which they form bonds, which results in a denser magma. Their discovery helps pinpoint how magma behaves deep in the Earth and is a missing piece in the puzzle of how Earth’s core formed.

The study, published in Nature, was supported by the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance and European Research Council and carried out with the DESY Photon Science facility at Hamburg, the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, Vrije Universitat Amsterdam, and Goethe-Universitat Frankfurt.

Dr Chrystele Sanloup, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Physics and Astronomy, who took part in the study, said: “Modern labs make it possible for scientists to recreate conditions deep in the Earth’s core, and give us valuable insight into how materials behave at such extremes. This helps us build on what we already know about how Earth formed.”


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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh


New insights gleaned from volcanic rock are helping scientists better understand how our planet evolved billions of years ago.

Studies of basalt, the material that forms from cooling lava, are being used to develop a timeline of how the planet and its atmosphere were formed.

Scientists examined liquid basalt or magma at record high pressures and temperatures. Their findings suggest molten magma once formed an ocean within the Earth’s mantle, comprising two layers of fluid separated by a crystalline layer.

Scientists agree that Earth formed around 4.5 billion years ago, at which time much of the planet was molten. As it cooled, Earth’s crust was formed. Researchers are keen to pin down how the planet’s core and crust took shape and how its volcanic activity developed.

The discovery by a European team of scientists involving the University of Edinburgh, using hi-tech laboratories, supports current theories of how and when our planet evolved. To recreate conditions at the Earth’s core, scientists placed basalt under pressures equivalent to almost one billion times that of Earth’s atmosphere and temperatures above 2000 Celsius.

They found that at high pressure, silicon atoms in the basalt change the way in which they form bonds, which results in a denser magma. Their discovery helps pinpoint how magma behaves deep in the Earth and is a missing piece in the puzzle of how Earth’s core formed.

The study, published in Nature, was supported by the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance and European Research Council and carried out with the DESY Photon Science facility at Hamburg, the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, Vrije Universitat Amsterdam, and Goethe-Universitat Frankfurt.

Dr Chrystele Sanloup, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Physics and Astronomy, who took part in the study, said: “Modern labs make it possible for scientists to recreate conditions deep in the Earth’s core, and give us valuable insight into how materials behave at such extremes. This helps us build on what we already know about how Earth formed.”


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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uoe-vrp110613.php
Tags: Solar eclipse 2013   Battlefield 4   kris jenner   nytimes   Jason Heyward  

PHOTO: A Partial Solar Eclipse As Seen In New York

If you were on the East Coast and got up very early this morning, you may have gotten a celestial treat.

As the Capital Weather Gang explained, this eclipse was a hybrid event, appearing as a total eclipse or annular eclipse in some places on Earth. The Weather Gang explains:

“Solar and lunar eclipses – like gathering at Thanksgiving – belong to families. And these eclipse families are called “saros,” a series of eclipses related over time, occurring over a span of several hundred years. This Nov. 3 solar eclipse is the 23rd eclipse of Saros 143, a series which started on March 7, 1617 and which ends April 23, 2897 – for 72 eclipses in a span of 1,280 years.”

In any case, in New York, it looked spectacular:

A partial Solar eclipse is seen just after sunrise over the Queens borough of New York across the East River on Sunday in New York.

Stan Honda /AFP/Getty Images

A partial Solar eclipse is seen just after sunrise over the Queens borough of New York across the East River on Sunday in New York.

Stan Honda /AFP/Getty Images

Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/11/03/242816980/photo-a-partial-solar-eclipse-as-seen-in-new-york?ft=1&f=1001
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